Rushed passage of anti-lynching bill reflects decadence of US political system (NYT-Xinhua)

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Photo taken on Sept. 17, 2021 shows the United States Capitol building in Washington, DC, United States. (Xinhua/Liu Jie)

Conceived by a group of black lawmakers in the House and Senate, the anti-lynching legislation emerged after more than 200 failed attempts over a period of more than 100 years.

NEW YORK, April 3 (Xinhua) — As the United States celebrated the passage and signing of an anti-lynching bill, it should reflect on the fact that the political system was the main obstacle to protecting the lives and livelihoods of its own citizens, The New York Times reported on Friday.

US President Joe Biden signed the Emmett Till Anti-Lynching Act on Tuesday to make lynching a federal crime. Conceived by a group of black lawmakers in the House and Senate, the anti-lynching legislation emerged after more than 200 failed attempts over a period of more than 100 years.

“A lynching is more than a violent act directed at a single individual. Past and present, lynchings are meant to intimidate an entire community – to reinforce race and class hierarchies through brutal acts of communal violence,” said the newspaper in his opinion. article titled “This is why it took over 100 years to get an anti-lynching bill.”

Within the American political system, “Southern lawmakers acted as a bloc, both in Congress and in the Democratic Party, where they continued to reside and to which they harnessed their political loyalties until well after World War II. world,” the report said.

“The South, when voting as a bloc, could veto any candidate deemed hostile to its interests. In Congress, committee control could kill legislation that threatened the power and autonomy of the white South before ‘it will not reach the ground, or force lawmakers outside the South to bend to their preferences,’ the report adds.


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